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SILVER SPRING, Md., June 13, 2018 (PRNewswire-USNewswire) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, along with state and local officials, are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections. The CDC reports that fruit salad mixes that include pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and cut fruit medley products containing any of these melons are the likely source of this outbreak.

The FDA advises consumers not to eat pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and pre-cut fruit medley products containing any of these melons produced at the Caito Foods facility in Indianapolis, Indiana. Caito Foods, LLC distributed products produced at this facility in Georgia, Illinois, Iowa, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio. The products were packaged in clear, plastic clamshell containers and distributed to several major retailers, including Costco, Jay C, Kroger, Payless, Owen's, Sprouts, Trader Joe's, Walgreens, Walmart, and Whole Foods/Amazon. Caito Foods, LLC has recalled fruit salad mixes that contain pre-cut melons to prevent further distribution of potentially contaminated products. However, consumers may still have these products in their possession.

"It's critical we quickly identify the cause and source of a foodborne outbreak, especially in cases like this where the food may still be in the hands of consumers. There's still a lot to learn about this outbreak, but we're confident that most of the illnesses in this outbreak are linked to pre-cut melon from a facility in Indiana. Using this information, we were able to quickly work with the company and retailers to recall the product and remove it from the marketplace. We're also working with our colleagues at CDC to make sure consumers know about the contaminated melon and protect themselves by discarding any product that may still be in their fridge or freezer," said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. "While we've made important progress, work remains to address the risks and pinpoint the source of the contamination. FDA field staff have sampled the facility and are conducting an inspection that'll help identify the actions the company will need to take to prevent an outbreak from happening again. We will continue to share our progress toward these goals and provide updates as we learn more."

The following is an update on the FDA's outbreak investigation. 

Outbreak Investigation Summary

  • FDA and CDC have linked a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Adelaide infections to cut melon and fruit salad mixes that include pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and fresh-cut fruit medley products containing any of these melons produced at the Caito Foods facility in Indianapolis, Indiana.
  • Caito Foods, LLC distributed products produced at this facility in Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina and Ohio.
  • Caito Foods, LLC recalled fruit salad mixes that contain pre-cut melons.
  • The FDA published a list of products and retailers that were identified through the investigation.
  • The FDA has sampled the Caito facility and is working to identify the source of the contamination.

Outbreak Investigation

  • The CDC reports 60 people became ill between April 30, 2018 and May 30, 2018.
  • 31 people have been hospitalized.
  • To date, no deaths have been reported.
  • The cases are spread across five states: Illinois (6), Indiana (11), Michigan (32), Missouri (10) and Ohio (1).
  • People who became ill range in age from 1 to 97 years, with a median age of 67.
  • Sixty-five percent of ill people are female.
  • To date, one (1) production facility was identified and a recall was initiated.

Advice for Consumers

  • The FDA advises consumers not to eat pre-cut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and fresh-cut fruit medley products containing any of these melons produced at the Caito Foods facility in Indianapolis, Indiana.
  • FDA published a list of recalled products and retail locations where they may have been purchased for consumers to identify if they have the product.
  • If consumers have any of the recalled product they should dispose of it, or return the product for a refund.
  • People who think they might have symptoms of a Salmonella infection should consult their health care professional.
  • People with questions about food safety can call the FDA at 1-888-SAFEFOOD or consult the FDA's website.

The FDA is continuing to investigate this outbreak and will share more information as it becomes available.

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