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Photos of the Day: Decoding DNA to Fight Deadly Food Poisoning

Mon, 04/07/2014 - 10:17am

The nation's disease detectives are launching a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target is listeria, the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning.

This photo taken Nov. 25, 2013 shows microbiologist Ashley Sabol extracting Listeria bacteria for genome sequencing in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The nation's disease detectives are beginning a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target: Listeria, a kind of bacteria that's the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning, and one that's especially dangerous to pregnant women. Already, the technology has helped to solve a small listeria outbreak that killed one person in California and sickened seven others in Maryland. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Read: Experts Fight Food Poisoning by Decoding Germ DNA

The nation's disease detectives are launching a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target is listeria, the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning.

This photo taken Nov. 25, 2013 shows microbiologist Dr. Molly Freeman pulling Listeria bacteria from a tube to be tested for its DNA fingerprinting in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

The nation's disease detectives are launching a program to try to outsmart outbreaks by routinely decoding the DNA of potentially deadly bacteria and viruses. The initial target is listeria, the third-leading cause of death from food poisoning.

This photo taken Nov. 25, 2013 shows microbiologist Heather Carleton pulling up results of Listeria bacteria DNA while demonstrating a whole-genome sequencing machine called a MiSeq in a foodborne disease outbreak lab at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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