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Consumer Trends: What Your Taste Buds Say About You

Mon, 04/07/2014 - 12:00pm

LONDON (PRNewswire) — Chances are, most of us have defined someone's character as plain or "vanilla." After all, these descriptions perfectly emphasize just how unexciting a person is. But surprise, surprise — it seems we've been mistaken all along. A study of over 2,000 participants, commissioned by Danio[1], on the link between flavor preferences and character traits has uncovered that plain and vanilla lovers are actually the life and soul of the party[2], and are among the most outgoing of them all.

The same study, analyzed by expert nutritional neuroscientist Professor Andrew Smith from Cardiff University, has revealed the interesting connection between flavor preference and personality. We've long suspected that chocolate and emotional moments are a match made in heaven, and the results confirm it: chocoholics tend to be sensitive souls[3]. And if you think those who prefer bitter flavors are as unpleasant as their taste buds, you're wrong — they are in fact the most optimistic people around.

Is there a correlation between sour tastes and the sour grapes of the nation? Unlikely. Research has shown those who opt for sharp and tangy flavors are in fact lively and impulsive.

Here's a tip for those who are active on the dating circuit, too — we generally like or dislike the same flavors as the people we're attracted to. So if your blind date absolutely devours something that turns your stomach, don't say we didn't warn you.

Research  Key  Findings

  • Sweet tastes are most popular (94%)
  • Bitter tastes are least popular (40%)
  • Those who like bitter tastes are most likely to have an optimistic outlook (55%)
  • Those who like sour tastes are more likely to be lively (36%) and impulsive (30%)
  • 69% of us are attracted to people with similar taste preference

Revealed:  The  nation's  favorite  flavors

  1. Plain/ Vanilla
  2. Chocolate
  3. Raspberry
  4. Strawberry
  5. Blueberry

The study of over 2,000 UK participants marks the launch of Danio's new flavors, which introduces three new delicious additions to the range — Mango, Honey and Plain.  

On the findings, Professor Smith comments: "There is considerable evidence linking nutrition and the brain. The present results confirm that a person's psychological characteristics are linked to their preference for tastes and flavors. This is because the same parts of the brain are associated with your personality and flavor preference. Further research can extend these findings and provide insight on how your mood influences your choice of food and drink."

Danio yogurts are made using Danone's strained yogurt recipe, which uses twice the milk of standard yogurts, making it amazingly thick. What's more, the straining process makes Danio high in protein; each pot contains around 12g, which contributes to the maintenance and growth of muscle mass. Thanks to its amazingly thick texture, high protein content and delicious taste, Danio really hits the spot as a tasty snack for any time of the day, to be enjoyed as part of a healthy, balanced diet and lifestyle.

The new Mango,  Honey and Plain flavors contain 0% fat, with Mango and Honey averaging 122kcal per pot, while the Plain version contains just 81kcal. The RRP for Danio is 85p per pot.

Visit http://www.facebook.com/danioyogurt for more information, or share your Danio experience on Twitter @danioUK.

About  Danone  UK:

Danone UK is part of Danone Groupe with a mission to bring health through food to as many people as possible. The group, whose products are sold on five continents, has more than 180 production plants and around 100,000 employees. Danone's expertise in yogurt making dates back to 1919. Danio is the fifth brand from Danone in the UK, added to its portfolio of Actimel, Activia, Shape and Oykos.

About  Professor  Andrew  Smith:

Professor Andrew P Smith is a Nutritional Neuroscientist based at Cardiff University. His major focus is on wellbeing and how your diet influences behaviour. He has conducted research projects funded by research councils, government agencies, charities and companies such as Procter and Gamble, Kellogg's, Guinness Ltd and Unilever.

1. The research for Danio was carried out online between 28  /  02  /  2014 and 18  /  03  /  2014 amongst a UK representative sample of 2,016 adults aged 16-75 years old

2. Those who like plain/vanilla are almost twice as likely to describe themselves as extravert, compared to those that dislike plain/vanilla

3. 58% of those who like chocolate describe themselves as emotional

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