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Consumer Trends: Adding Protein to Breakfast

Thu, 03/07/2013 - 12:00pm

PARK RIDGE, Ill. (PRNewswire) — New research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests that eating a protein-rich breakfast reduces hunger, boosts satiety and reduces brain responses involved with food cravings more than a typical breakfast that is lower in protein.1 Further, these responses were followed by a significant reduction in unhealthy evening snacking following the protein-rich breakfast only.1 The study, conducted at the University of Missouri, measured the effects of eating either a high-protein breakfast that included eggs and beef (containing 35 g of protein), a ready-to-eat cereal breakfast with less than half the protein (13 g of protein), but equal amount of calories (350 calories), or no breakfast for seven days, in overweight teenage girls who typically skip breakfast.1 

Participants who consumed breakfast meals that included protein-rich eggs and beef, which contained 40% protein, 40% carbohydrate and 20% fat, reported greater feelings of fullness compared to those who ate a cereal-based breakfast which contained 15% protein, 65% carbohydrate and 20% fat. The higher-protein breakfast also led to significant improvements in daily hunger and satiety hormone levels, reduced food cravings prior to dinner (as shown from reduced neural activation) and resulted in consumption of fewer high-fat evening snacks than skipping breakfast.1

Building on the Benefits of Breakfast with Protein

While several studies have examined the cognitive benefits of eating breakfast, such as greater memory recall time, improved grades and higher test scores, these findings build on a growing body of evidence supporting the beneficial role of protein as part of a nutritious breakfast.2-4 High-quality protein, from foods like eggs and lean beef, is a powerful nutrient that helps strengthen and sustain the body and may help manage weight. 5-7

"Adolescents consume nearly half of their daily calories after 4:00 PM, often through foods with little nutritional value. Eating breakfast, particularly one that is higher in protein, appears to help control unhealthy nighttime snacking," says Dr. Heather Leidy, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology at University of Missouri and lead author of the study.

Protein at the Breakfast Table

"Luckily, it's easy to enjoy more high-quality protein in your diet and get the essential nutrients you need for optimal health," says registered dietitian Neva Cochran, "Eggs and lean meat are perfect partners for vegetables, fruits, whole grains and low-fat dairy, making it even easier to enjoy a balanced diet."

Cochran also suggests planning ahead by hard-boiling eggs and cutting up fruits and vegetables over the weekend or making a protein-rich grab-and-go breakfast, like this Beef, Egg and Spinach Breakfast Sandwich. For more simple recipe ideas or tips on building nutritious, protein-rich meals, visit www.EggNutritionCenter.org or www.IncredibleEgg.org.

About the American Egg Board (AEB)

AEB connects America's egg farmers with consumers, communicates the value of The incredible edible egg™ and receives funding from a national legislative checkoff on all egg production from companies with more than 75,000 hens in the continental United States. The board consists of 18 members and 18 alternates from all regions of the country who are appointed by the Secretary of Agriculture. The AEB staff carries out the programs under the board's direction. AEB is located in Park Ridge, Ill. Visit www.IncredibleEgg.org for more information.

About the Egg Nutrition Center (ENC)

The Egg Nutrition Center (ENC) is the health education and research center of the American Egg Board. Established in 1979, ENC provides science-based information to health promotion agencies, physicians, dietitians, nutritional scientists, media and consumers on issues related to egg nutrition and the role of eggs in the American diet. ENC is located in Park Ridge, IL. Visit www.eggnutritioncenter.org or www.nutritionunscrambled.com for more information.

References:

  1. Leidy HJ, Ortinau LC, Douglas SM, Hoertel HA. Beneficial effects of a higher-protein breakfast on the appetitive, hormonal, and neural signals controlling energy intake regulation in overweight/obese "breakfast-skipping" late-adolescent girls. Am J Clin Nutr [Published online February 2013]
  2. Rampersaud G, et al. Breakfast habits, nutritional status, body weight, and academic performance in children and adolescents. JADA 2005; 105:743-760.
  3. Pollitt E, et al. Fasting and cognition in well- and undernourished school children: a review of three experimental studies. AJCN 1998; 67:779S-784S.
  4. Food Research and Action Center. Breakfast for learning: scientific research on the link between children's nutritional and academic performance, 2011. Retrieved 2/25/13 from http://frac.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/breakfastforlearning.pdf
  5. Leidy HJ, et al. Neural responses to visual food stimuli after a normal vs. higher protein breakfast in breakfast-skipping teens: a pilot fMRI study. Obesity 2011; 19(10):2019-25.
  6. Leidy HJ, Racki EM. The addition of a protein-rich breakfast and its effect on acute appetite control and food intake in 'breakfast skipping' adolescents. Int J Obs 2010; 34(7):1125-33.
  7. Krebs NF, Gao D, Gralla J, et al. Efficacy and safety of a high protein, low carbohydrate diet for weight loss in severely obese adolescents. J Pediatr 2010; 157(2):252-8.
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